CCIH Network Zika Response and Resources Print {sharethis label=}
CCIH Network Response 
 
CCIH members are responding to the Zika virus in a number of ways, such as providing bed nets, educating communities, reducing the mosquito population, treating people infected with Zika, providing family planning services to women who want to avoid pregnancy due to harmful complications from Zika infection to developing babies, and more. Here is a summary of responses from some CCIH members. Please let us know if your organization is responding by contacting kathy.erb [at] ccih.org
 
ADRA International
 
  • Providing bed nets to protect people from mosquitoes
  • Educating people at risk for Zika exposure on how to protect themselves
  • Reducing mosquito population
  • preventing breeding areas with covered water container distribution
 
Active in Honduras, Brazil, El Salvador, Dominican Republic, Paraguay
 
Blessings International
 
  • Treating people infected with Zika
  • Providing medicines to various teams treating symptoms for those infected with the Zika virus.
 
Active in All Countries in the Caribbean and Central America.
 
CMMB
 
  • Educating people at risk for Zika exposure on how to protect themselves
  • Treating people infected with Zika
  • Improving health facilities and equipping health workers to address Zika
  • Advocacy with US Government, local government, or multilateral organizations for funding to combat Zika
 
Active in Haiti
 
ISAIAH 58 CARE FOUNDATION
 
  • Providing bed nets to protect people from mosquitoes
  • Reducing mosquito population
  • Awareness and sensitization of communities on dangers of keeping dirty environments that breeds mosquitoes. Fighting Zika requires raising awareness on how people can protect themselves, as well as supporting communities. Isaiah 58 knows that there is an urgent need to inform the public about the realities of the virus.
 
Active in Nigeria
 
MAMA Project
 
  • Treating people with Zika (those that come to the consultation saying that they have Zika)
  • Providing medicines to treat Zika to the local public clinics
  • Educating the people about the prevention of vector-bourne illnesses, including Zika
 
Active in Honduras
 
MAP International
 
  • Treating people infected with Zika
  • Improving health facilities and equipping health workers to address Zika
  • MAP International is responding immediately to fulfill field requests for strong mosquito repellents, pain relievers and antibiotics. Our primary goal is to protect mothers and their unborn children from this virus that is known to cause birth defects and poor pregnancy outcomes.
 
Active in the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Haiti
 
Medical Teams International
 
Educating people at risk for Zika exposure on how to protect themselves
 
Active in Guatemala and Haiti
 
Samaritan's Purse
 
  • Develop information and orientation materials
  • Training social services personnel to prevent neglect and abandonment in cases of newborns with microcephaly as a result of Zika virus
  • Provide technical assistance to prioritized municipal governments and departmental governments for the development of contingency plans for protection of boys, girls and adolescents.
 
Active in Bolivia, Cambodia, Haiti, Myanmar, and Vietnam
 
UMCOR
 
  • Providing bed nets to protect people from mosquitoes
  • Educating people at risk for Zika exposure on how to protect themselves
  • Providing family planning to help women avoid pregnancies where the child may be affected by Zika
  • Improving health facilities and equipping health workers to address Zika
  • Education to many partners since the outbreak began; nets to existing grantees.
 
Active in Brazil, Nicaragua, Haiti, Panama, Mexico, USA. Expect to provide nets in Nicaragua in the near future
 
To share your organization's response, please contact Kathy Erb at kathy.erb [at] ccih.org
 

 
About the Zika Virus 
 
Facts from WHO:
 
  • Zika virus disease is caused by a virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes.
  • People with Zika virus disease usually have a mild fever, skin rash (exanthema) and conjunctivitis. These symptoms normally last for 2-7 days.
  • There is no specific treatment or vaccine currently available.
  • The best form of prevention is protection against mosquito bites.
  • The virus is known to circulate in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific.
 
Resources from CDC | The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has compiled resources covering facts about the effects of Zika and prevention and transmission for health care workers, pregnant women and others. 
 
Potential Link between Zika Virus and Microcephaly in Infants
 
Recently in Brazil, local health authorities observed an increase in Zika virus infections in the general public as well as an increase in babies born with microcephaly in northeast Brazil. Agencies investigating the Zika outbreaks are finding an increasing body of evidence about the link between Zika virus and microcephaly. However, the WHO cautions that more investigation is needed before we understand the relationship between microcephaly in babies and the Zika virus and that other potential causes are also being investigated. | See WHO Fact Sheet for more
 
 

 
CCIH Network and Partner Resources 
 
Hesperian Fact Sheet and Illustrations | Hesperian developed a fact sheet with illustrations that is easily understood by the layperson on Zika, its symptoms, and how to take personal and community-wide precautions to limit its spread. It is available in a number of languages to ensure the information reaches the people who need it the most. | English | Spanish | French | Portuguese | Haitan Kreyol 
 
AmeriCares WebinarAmeriCares held a webinar February 3, 2016 on the Zika virus and how local communities are dealing with the risks and dangers of the virus. CCIH Board President Dr. Anne Peterson, AmeriCares and Dr. Julie Varghese, AmeriCares covered what is happening now, how Zika is spread, how to recognize symptoms and how a clinic in El Salvador on the front lines of the crisis is responding. | Watch a recording of the webinar
 
 
  
 
 
 
Last Updated ( Monday, 05 December 2016 20:29 )