Community Based Prevention and Care


    Upcoming Training 

    Community Health Evangelism (CHE) Training of Trainers | by Christian Health Service Corps | Participants in the highly interactive CHE Training of Trainers 1 (CHE TOT1) will learn approaches to teaching physical and spiritual topics that equip individuals and communities to identify issues and mobilize resources for positive growth and development. Participatory learning activities are employed through large and small group discussions, various hands-on activities, and methods that can be replicated in the community setting. Check listings for upcoming dates.

    Global Health and Tropical Medicine Overview | by Christian Health Service Corps | This course covers WHO guidelines such as Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses, topics such as malnutrition, skills including suturing, and an approach to tropical diseases. Check listings for upcoming dates.

    Sustainable Community Health and Development at the Jamkhed International Institute, IndiaJamkhed International Institute for Training & Research in Sustainable Community Health & Development

    Learn about the principles and practice of comprehensive community-based primary health care (CBPHC) at a sustainable program that is an international model from the staff and villagers who pioneered this transforming experience, through the principles of equity, integration, empowerment, based on their Christian faith and values, bringing health and well-being to their communities for over 40 years – and transform yourself and your understanding of health care.  See a Flyer about Upcoming Training

    Reports, Articles, Books and Webinars

    Engaging Communities to Improve Maternal and Child Health | December 2017 | Webinar featuring Henry Perry, MD, MPH, PhD, Senior Scientist, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Connie Gates, MPH, Jamkhed International – North America. Many Christian programs have been pioneers of the principles and practice of community-based primary health care (CBPHC). These experiences also influenced and informed WHO, resulting in the international Conference in Alma Ata and its Declaration in 1978, which put PHC on the global health agenda. Christian organizations continue to develop these approaches and understand their benefits, engaging and empowering communities to improve their own health, with Christian values as the foundational basis that make the impact more effective and sustainable. The webinar includes a recent review of 700 projects using CBPHC to improve Maternal and Child Health. Many of these projects are Christian organizations. The results were featured in the book, Engaging Communities for Improving Mothers’ and Children’s Health: Reviewing the Evidence of Effectiveness in Resource-Constrained Settings.

    Community-Based Approaches to Improve Maternal/Child Health | August 2013 | Webinar recording featuring Dr. Henry Perry, Senior Associate in International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health on the impact of community-based primary health care programs on health improvement, especially on the health of mothers and children. Access the webinar (Note-Java version 6 or later required is required to view session recordings)

    The Christian Community’s Contribution to the Evolution of Community-Based Primary Health Care | 2008 | This document evolved from a plenary session at the 2008 CCIH Annual Conference in which Dr. Carl Taylor and Dr. John “Jack” Bryant, two veterans of the early Christian experience and the 1978 Alma Ata conference of WHO/UNICEF, shared information about the early years in community health. The power point presentations of Dr. Bryant and Dr. Taylor may also be downloaded.

    Health for All: The Vanga Story | 2014 | Daniel Fountain | When Dr. Daniel Fountain arrived in the Congo in 1961, he was forced to depend upon a dilapidated hospital to serve 250,000 people. Discover how he relied on prayer and innovation to transform the outmoded facility into a state-of-the-art network of health services.

    Setting Up Community Health Programs: A Practical Manual for Use in Developing Countries | Ted Lankester | 2009

    Resources from Hesperian:

    Hesperian Health Guides: mainly community-based, some books they produce (with much input from their community partners around the world), other books that share their community-empowerment philosophy are included

    Primary health related applications for download.

    Where There Is No Doctor | Updated in 2015 | D. Werner | The most widely-used manual for health workers, educators, and others involved in primary care and health promotion around the world. The 2015 updated edition includes the latest medication information, a newly revised family planning chapter, new treatments for a variety of infections, and more.

    Resources about the Jamkhed Model:

    Jamkhed Model of Ministry | 2015 |  “A Sustainable, Comprehensive, Community-Based Primary Health Care (CBPHC) Approach based on Christian Values — Communities ‘Health’ Themselves” based on the Comprehensive Rural Health Project, Jamkhed, India

    Jamkhed: The Comprehensive Rural Health Project | Raj and Mabelle Arole | 1994

    Resources from TearFund:

    Tearfund International Learning Zone (TILZ) | Publications provide practical information and tools to equip people who are working to bring about positive change in their communities, covering a range of topics including food security, health, disasters, climate change and advocacy. Most publications are available in English, French, Portuguese and Spanish.

    Footsteps | A magazine sharing information, ideas, contacts and experience in a Christian context at grassroots level.

    PILLARS | Practical, discussion-based learning on community development for use in small community groups.

    Umoja | A church and community mobilization process, inspiring and equipping communities through the local church.

    World Council of Churches:

    Contact Magazine Started in 1970 (by Christian Medical Commission (CMC), which morphed into Health & Healing), it has promoted primary health care since then, as well as discussing other issues and providing case studies; WHO learned about PHC from CMC, which influenced AlmaAta Conference and Declaration. In the 1970s this was a primary resource on PHC for people throughout the world; copies were sent free to MoHs, universities, NGOs, Church mission boards, anyone who asked (Connie Gates produced issues 1-15).

    The Christian Medical Commission and the Development of WHO’s Primary Heath Care Approach | Socrates Litsios | American Journal for Public Health | November 2004